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Nothing prepares you for parenthood. Parenting classes, books, and advice can help, but nothing sets you up for how much your life changes when you become parents. The sleepless nights, continuous breast feedings, and constant diaper changes turn your life upside down. But what may surprise you is that, with time, you won’t mind doing these things. The most vital part about being a parent is that you naturally will give up so much for such a little-and sometimes demanding person.

Whether it is your 1st or 4th child, you need to get your home ready for a new baby. Getting this done before you bring your newborn baby home will make your life much more comfortable as you care for your newborn. Parents should consider the following when preparing a home for a new member of the family.

Door stopper and Door knob

The issue

Your newborn baby will be in your room for the first few months, so you will want to set the right sleeping environment in this space because it can make or break your baby’s sleep routine.

Arrangements

  • Install the door stopper wall protector from day one to reduce noise levels and give your baby a consistent and sound sleep. You will forget doorknobs damaging your walls and the noise of your doors slamming and banging because the door knob wall protector is the discreet and effective way to protect your home, walls, and ears.
  • If you have a splitting room for your baby, you will want to make it dark and quiet. Consider buying blackout curtains or liners for your window treatments so that the light does not wake your little one.

Living and playing areas

The baby or toddler will undoubtedly spend a lot of time in the living and playing areas of the home, such as the living room, toy room, or family room. Parents should thoroughly baby-proof these parts of the house.

After you finish the baby proofing, your living room may look and function a little differently for your child’s first few years. Safety comes first. Pick the most necessary baby proofing steps depending on the behavior and habits of your baby. Know your baby and know what they are likely to do.

Toys and Toy box

The issue

Toys and toy boxes are essential to have around the house, but not all products are 100% safe, mostly when left with an unattended baby or toddler. Toys for older children can have small parts that they can easily swallow, while some toy boxes can crush little fingers. Old toys can harbor germs, not safe for current standards, or get in the way.

Arrangements

  • Check the recommended age range for the toys given to your baby before you allow them to play with them.
  • Remove toys for older children until your child is of the age.
  • Get rid of old toys when they are no longer being used, wash them, and put them away for future siblings.
  • Research toys before selecting a product for your baby; toys should be of sturdy construction and made with lead-free paint.

Classic wooden toy boxes are attractive, but they can hurt your baby’s fingers if they slam shut. Choose a toy box with a lightweight, removable lid, especially for those who enjoy climbing inside.

Final Thoughts

Before baby proofing your home, observe your child’s perspective. See how your baby or toddler sees your space. Most of all, personalize your baby proofing. As your child grows, you will get a sense of your child’s personality.

It should be easy for you to predict what your child is likely to try and where your child is expected to find the problem. All babies are different. Some babies stick their fingers in every hole and push every button; others pull and climb on everything they see. Customize your baby-proofing efforts to your space at home and your child’s interests.

Spend your time teaching sound decision-making skills and establishing clear boundaries. Try to model exemplary behavior. Use words from an early age to explain why something is dangerous and how to stay safe. Having the tools you need to protect your child will ease some anxiety and save your child’s life.

Finally, do not forget that baby proofing can provide peace of mind, but nothing should replace adult supervision. Observe your baby!

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